95: Fleischbrueke and others in Nuernberg

The Fleischbruecke stands at the very centre of Nuernberg (or Nuremberg if you prefer the anglicised version.) The present bridge is pretty much contemporary with the Rialto with which it shares a flat arch profile and sunrise spandrels. The span is slightly smaller at 27m rather than the 31.8 of the Rialto. The side slopes here are much flatter too. Both Fleischbruceke and Rialto stand on raking piles. There will be a few bonus bridges too.

As always, there is a pdf here.

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A view along the river from an island shows the congestion of bridges there is through Nuernberg.

A view along the river from an island shows the congestion of bridges there is through Nuernberg.

Interesting crack to the right of this plaque.

Interesting crack to the right of this plaque.

And there is the gate to the old Fleischmarkt for which the bridge is named. And in the background, the ubiquitous Starberks. Can’t get away from it anywhere.

And there is the gate to the old Fleischmarkt for which the bridge is named. And in the background, the ubiquitous Starberks. Can’t get away from it anywhere.

Faced with these radial spandrels, how do you guess how thick the ring is.

Faced with these radial spandrels, how do you guess how thick the ring is.

Perhaps the smallest of these stones mark the ring. Are those strange bosses covering cross ties?

Perhaps the smallest of these stones mark the ring. Are those strange bosses covering cross ties?

Is that concrete I see before me? What’s that about. War damage, perhaps?

Is that concrete I see before me? What’s that about. War damage, perhaps?

This very narrow bridge seems to be the Henkenhaus Gallery. To the left is an island and a continuation bridge of timber called Henkersteg.

This very narrow bridge seems to be the Henkenhaus Gallery. To the left is an island and a continuation bridge of timber called Henkersteg.

I think this one is the Trodemarkt.

I think this one is the Trodemarkt.

And I presume those cover tie bars. I wonder why?

And I presume those cover tie bars. I wonder why?

There is a second bridge just visible in the right hand span here. Both carry substantial buildings.

There is a second bridge just visible in the right hand span here. Both carry substantial buildings.

Note the icebreakers on the MuseumsBruecke.

Note the icebreakers on the MuseumsBruecke.

A closer view of the Henkerbruecke.

A closer view of the Henkerbruecke.

This is as far as I got. I think the stone bridge carries the late medieval city wall. The bridge in front is interesting too.

This is as far as I got. I think the stone bridge carries the late medieval city wall. The bridge in front is interesting too.

Stone first. An interesting crack through that lower window.  The chains of the Kettensteg are fascinating. The long bars have T ends which are captured in those rings. The disassembly below curtesy of @MarkHipwell and Twitter. A bridge engineer who can sketch like that is worth a follow.

Stone first. An interesting crack through that lower window.

The chains of the Kettensteg are fascinating. The long bars have T ends which are captured in those rings. The disassembly below curtesy of @MarkHipwell and Twitter. A bridge engineer who can sketch like that is worth a follow.

The chains of the Kettensteg are fascinating. The long bars have T ends which are captured in those rings.

The chains of the Kettensteg are fascinating. The long bars have T ends which are captured in those rings.

This disassembly courtesy of @markhipwell1990 and Twitter. A bridge engineer who can sketch like that is worth a follow.

This disassembly courtesy of @markhipwell1990 and Twitter. A bridge engineer who can sketch like that is worth a follow.

Well, that’s November covered. Just December of 2018 and I am up to date. I think that will be a brief one.